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Posts tagged with "Death"

Ligature strangulation marks

Ligature strangulation marks

Serial Killers with Morbid Death Fascinations
John Wayne Gacy - worked in a mortuary, sleeping in the embalming room, alone with corpses, but was fired after corpses were found partially undressed
Dennis Nilsen - pretended he was a corpse and masturbated in the mirror to his own dead image
Jeffrey Dahmer - loved the dissection in biology class, told a classmate that he sliced open the fish he caught because “I want to see what it looks like inside, I like to see how things work.”
Ed Gein - grave robbing, lamp shades made from human skin, seat covers, and skulls used for drinking cups. He also made clothing and bracelets out of body parts

Serial Killers with Morbid Death Fascinations

  • John Wayne Gacy - worked in a mortuary, sleeping in the embalming room, alone with corpses, but was fired after corpses were found partially undressed
  • Dennis Nilsen - pretended he was a corpse and masturbated in the mirror to his own dead image
  • Jeffrey Dahmer - loved the dissection in biology class, told a classmate that he sliced open the fish he caught because “I want to see what it looks like inside, I like to see how things work.”
  • Ed Gein - grave robbing, lamp shades made from human skin, seat covers, and skulls used for drinking cups. He also made clothing and bracelets out of body parts

Rigor Mortis (latin: stiffness after death)

  • Caused by a chemical reaction in the muscles after death
  • a good determination of the time of death - it begins a few hours post-mortem, reaches it’s maximum at about 12 hours, and then gradually decreased for about 3 days. Environmental factors, such as temperature, can speed up or slow down the process.

Post-mortem lividity (livor mortis), or hypostasis

  • the pooling of the blood dependent on the position of the body.
  • lividity which does not match the position the body is found in is a good determinate of the body being moved post-mortem

Algor Mortis - the gradual decline in body temperature after death

  • generally a 2 degrees C decrease in the first hour, and 1 degree thereafter - with the ambient temperature having a significant effect on this rate

Decomposition

Decomposition is the process whereby bodily tissues are broken down into smaller molecules after death. The physical and chemical properties observed during decay are categorized into five stages: (1) fresh, (2) putrefaction, (3) black putrefaction,(4) butyric fermentation, and (5) dry decay

Examining Wounds During Autopsy
One of the greatest challenges of an autopsy is examining the wounds. The essence of the medical examiner’s job is to use his or her skill and experience to determine the true nature and cause of a particular wound. Depending on the type of wound or weapon used, this can get difficult. Dr. Kiesel talks about those difficulties:
” [When] they weren’t shot once, they were shot 13 times or 20 times … you’ve got to sort out paths of all these bullets. You’ve got to figure out where each bullet went. The old way of doing it was, ‘Well, he’s got 10 holes on the front, there are eight holes on the back, and there’s two bullets inside, we’re done.’ [The] legal system won’t accept that anymore”
Homicide cases have to be examined carefully and thoroughly. A part of a medical examiner’s job includes testifying in court. Medical examiners are often called upon to explain their findings on the stand. Their findings can have a large impact on the lives of all those who are part of the case.
Dr. Kiesel explains how wounds have patterns that help to determine their origins:
“Bludgeoning, where you have someone who’s been physically assaulted and beaten, you’ve got a lot of different injuries. Sometimes these injuries have patterns. Sometimes the injury patterns give you a clue as to what weapon may have been used. Sometimes there’s more than one weapon. I had a case where a person was done in by one individual, but that individual used at least four different weapons. So we had four different types of patterned injuries on that person.”
Through years of education and experience, the medical examiner learns to recognize these patterns and the types of trauma with which they are associated.
(Dr. Kiesel is the Deputy Chief Medical Examiner of Fulton County)

Examining Wounds During Autopsy

One of the greatest challenges of an autopsy is examining the wounds. The essence of the medical examiner’s job is to use his or her skill and experience to determine the true nature and cause of a particular wound. Depending on the type of wound or weapon used, this can get difficult. Dr. Kiesel talks about those difficulties:

” [When] they weren’t shot once, they were shot 13 times or 20 times … you’ve got to sort out paths of all these bullets. You’ve got to figure out where each bullet went. The old way of doing it was, ‘Well, he’s got 10 holes on the front, there are eight holes on the back, and there’s two bullets inside, we’re done.’ [The] legal system won’t accept that anymore”

Homicide cases have to be examined carefully and thoroughly. A part of a medical examiner’s job includes testifying in court. Medical examiners are often called upon to explain their findings on the stand. Their findings can have a large impact on the lives of all those who are part of the case.

Dr. Kiesel explains how wounds have patterns that help to determine their origins:

“Bludgeoning, where you have someone who’s been physically assaulted and beaten, you’ve got a lot of different injuries. Sometimes these injuries have patterns. Sometimes the injury patterns give you a clue as to what weapon may have been used. Sometimes there’s more than one weapon. I had a case where a person was done in by one individual, but that individual used at least four different weapons. So we had four different types of patterned injuries on that person.”

Through years of education and experience, the medical examiner learns to recognize these patterns and the types of trauma with which they are associated.

(Dr. Kiesel is the Deputy Chief Medical Examiner of Fulton County)

Body Farm Research Facilities

The first body farm (officially known as the University of Tennessee Forensic Anthropology Facility) was opened by Dr. William Bass in 1971. Bass recognized the need for research into human decomposition after police repeatedly asked for his help analyzing bodies in criminal cases. What started as a small area with one body has developed into a 3-acre complex that contains remains of around 40 individuals at any one time. The facility became famous (and gained its moniker) after it inspired Patricia Cornwell’s 1995 novel, “The Body Farm.”

Where do these bodies come from? When Dr. Bass first started the body farm, he used unclaimed bodies from medical examiners’ offices. Later, people started donating their bodies to the facility to help with forensic studies.

There’s no common set of standards or guidelines that body farms adhere to, other than safety, security and privacy. Even the dimensions of the facilities vary. Western Carolina University’s body farm is about 59-feet (18 m) squared and is built to hold about six to 10 bodies at a time, while the body farm at the University of Tennessee holds around 40 bodies and covers nearly 3 acres. And even body farms are bigger in Texas: The facility at Texas State University-San Marcos covers about 5 acres.

Each facility also has a different focus. The Tennessee body farm pursues a broad range of study into decomposition under all conditions — buried, unburied, underwater and even in the trunks of cars. The body farm at Western Carolina places emphasis on decomposition in the mountainous region of the Carolinas. Texas’ body farm also provides region-specific data. Forensic anthropologists from states like New Mexico are waiting on data from Texas so they can comprehensively study decomposition in desert climates.

 Generally, when a facility accepts a body, it’s placed in a refrigerator (not unlike one found in a morgue). The body is then assigned an identifying number and placed in a specific location on the grounds of the body farm. The location of each body is carefully mapped. Students learn how to maintain the chain of evidence when working with the bodies. In a criminal case, it’s imperative that anyone coming into contact with human remains logs that he or she handled it. This way, no legal questions can be raised about the integrity of the evidence or possible gaps in its custody.

The bodies are allowed to decompose for various amounts of time. Then students practice locating, collecting and removing the remains from the area. The remains are taken to a laboratory and further analyzed. When analysis is finished, the skeleton may be returned to the family of the deceased for burial, if requested. Otherwise, it will likely remain in the department’s collection of skeletons. U of T-Knoxville boasts a collection of skeletal remains from more than 700 people.

Body farms may or may not cover the bodies with wire cages. Doing so prevents coyotes in Texas from making off with body parts, but security fencing at the much smaller Western Carolina facility is sufficient.

dead-men-talking:

Guide To Observing Your First Autoposy

AUG. 19, 2012 

I work in a hospital filing in the medical records department. Because I’m student-aged and am considerably curious and intelligent, I often strike up conversations with people in other departments. The short of it is, I wound up being offered an opportunity to observe an autopsy — every biology nerds dream, no? — and it was the most challenging experience, both academically and spiritually, of my life. Here are a few things I learned.

1. The first few minutes are going to be weird. No matter how chill you think you’re going to be upon walking into the morgue, the initial shock is going to send you into a very bizarre type of consciousness. Seeing someone in an open casket at a wake does not prepare you for the morbid imagery of the autopsy experience. You have to go into it knowing that, really, there’s no way to prepare, and you can’t be 100% sure of how you’ll react. The toughest med students often faint or puke in the first minute.

2. You very faint and/or puke. Don’t worry about what the pathologist thinks of you: they’ve seen it all. Part of the job is having students observe and they’ve seen everything. The best way to respect them — and the other people in the room with you (alive or not) — is to be aware of what’s going on in your body so that if you’re going to yak everywhere, you can quickly exit the room to the bathroom or, if you’re stubborn and won’t leave in time, at least find the nearest bin. Don’t puke in the sink, they’re going to use that to rinse body parts. If you’re feeling faint, don’t psych yourself out: part of it is from the chemicals in the room and the fact that you’re probably wearing a surgical mask that makes it hard to breathe. If you can, sit down on a stool or chair for a few minutes while you adjust. If there are no options for seating (as was the case when I observed) position yourself with your back on the wall so that if you pass out you’re body will just sort of crumple to the corner and not get in anyone’s way. Seriously, fainting medical students can be extremely dangerous in a room filled with sharp tools and body fluids.

3. Take it easy before and after. I didn’t get a chance to prepare before the observation because autopsies occur infrequently at the hospital where I work, instead, I was called about five minutes before it started and had to run down to the morgue without much time to mentally prepare. In some ways, I think it ended up working to my advantage because I tend to over think things, but if you have advance notice of when you’ll be attending an observation, take the day before very slowly and try to chill as much as possible. Eat a healthy — not heavy — breakfast. Don’t drink too much coffee, or take any stimulants. The adrenaline that will kick in naturally, because you’re a human being face-to-face with death, is going to be very intense. If you’re already hyped up when you go in, you’ll probably end up in an adrenal crisis by the end of the autopsy.

It’s also important you take good care of yourself after. You’ll be on a high for a few hours, and you may have trouble sleeping. Drink plenty of water, have a snack, do something to decompress. Write down what you remember in vivid detail for later reference — and then put on an episode of Community and hang out. If you feel anxious and unnerved, talk it out. You’re going to be processing it for a few days.

4. Ask questions, but don’t be chatty… or weird. The pathologist — and the body — are there to teach. If you have legitimate questions, ask them, but be as succinct as possible. The pathologist, no matter how skilled, is doing some serious multitasking. They’re trying to discern cause of death while keeping an eye on a room of wide-eyed people who are lobbing questions in their direction. Be respectful, don’t crack jokes (leave that to the goofy assistant who “irrigates the entrails” — if they want to make a joke, let them, because that job must really, really suck), and don’t waste the pathologist’s time with obvious quandaries. If you have less specific questions, save them for the end. During the autopsy itself, keep your inquiries based on what’s happening right in front of you.

5. Yes, it’s as gross as you think. Your senses are going to get assaulted, even with full garb and a mask; autopsies are messy, and you never know what’s going to turn up once you get in there. The pathologist has no way of knowing — hence why the autopsy is being performed — so don’t assume that you’re going to see a bunch of normal organs. You might see tumor covered stomachs, black lungs, atrophied brains, and lots of blood, bile and poop. Everything smells. The smell of blood is what you’d expect, but the viscera itself is more earthy, almost muddy. The bile from the gallbladder smells very sour and acidic, as you would expect, and that’s actually what bothered me the most. When they cut into it, prepare. The poop is actually not that bad — it’s not like you haven’t seen and smelled poop before. You’re also going to experience a lot of chemical scents, and frankly, the formaldehyde (preserving fluid) was what had me feeling light-headed.

6. The more organs that get removed, the easier it gets to watch. There’s a pretty standard sequence for removing innards: the ribcage is lifted off, lungs taken out, then heart, then liver-stomach-intestines, kidneys, gonads, etc. The more organs that are removed, the less you can look at the body on the slab as though it’s a person. Because you never forget, not even for a moment, that the cadaver in front of you was alive just a few days ago. But the more you look at it separately — “This is the heart, these are the lungs” — the more you can detach yourself from the personal element. And that is essential to the experience. The pathologist has to detach in order to decimate a human being. The organs are not only removed, but cut up so they can look for abnormalities. By the end, everything is piecemeal and that’s a little bit disturbing. It’s probably helpful, then, that by the time the skull is ready to be sawed into for brain extraction, you’ve temporarily detached yourself from the spiritual element of things.

7. Watching the brain come out is an ordeal. This usually takes the longest, sometimes upwards of an hour. The hair and scalp are sliced through and the skin of the forehead (cut as far back as Zooey Deschanel’s bangs) is folded down over the face, while the back part is folded down toward the neck, exposing the skull. Think for a moment of how hard your skull has to be to protect your brain. You can’t just saw into a skull with a normal skill saw, you need serious power tools. And essentially, that’s exactly what happens. There is an enormous, loudly whirring saw that the pathologist uses to cut off the top of the skull. She also may use a hammer to help the skull “pop” off, revealing the brain. Even once the bone is removed, there are still meniges to cut through, all the while being very mindful of the delicate tissue just below. The brain itself can only be examined minimally when it’s first removed; it will have to be soaked in preservation fluid for two weeks before it will be ready to section and examine more deeply. It’s because of this that autopsy reports always include, “results pending”, because the brain takes the longest to examine, and many times that’s where the cause of death lies. So, the other organs are returned to the body before it’s sewn up so that the body is complete as possible for burial. The brain, however, is off to the lab.

8. You will never forget the name of the person, their story, and how they died. I won’t share the details with you, but I will never forget them.

9. Your paradigm is going to shift, big time. In addition to having some foods suddenly look weirdly unappetizing and feeling like you have x-ray eyes and can perfectly imagine what everyone’s insides look like, you’re going to have some new feelings about life. Being right next to death, and seeing a person be reduced to a dilapidated pile of skin really changes your perspective on things. You might really start thinking twice about all the shit you eat, or the packs of American Spirits you smoke per day. You might suddenly lose interest in binge drinking. You may decide that it really is time to lose that last ten pounds. You will likely be very grateful that you are young, healthy and full of happily functioning organs. You will also be quite pleased that you aren’t dead, because it’s actually quite a sad affair.

10. You will become highly critical of every autopsy scene in every television show, movie or instructional video. Suddenly you’re going to feel like you’re the fucking expert in forensic pathology, because you know, seeing one autopsy be performed is clearly the equivalent of 15 years of medical school. Crime shows will seem a little silly, the bloody bits fake and discolored. The squishy sounds will be overstated and comical. You’ll even judge their tools, because every pathologist knows that “the single best way to remove the ribcage is with a set of hedge clippers from Home Depot.” Even though your hands never held a scalpel the entire time, you’ll never be able to watch CSI again without saying, ”Psh, they aren’t using a proper enterotome to cut through those intestines.” TC mark

#9 is already very true for me…it was definitely more intense after I visited an anatomy class.

THE 5 STAGES OF EMBALMING
1. Pre-embalming
once the body is released for embalming by the doctor or medical examiner’s office, the embalmer is called to remove the body. Paperwork is filled out and the body is transported to the funeral home for embalming, if requested or required (not all states, areas require embalming)
an embalming report is filled out and any personal items are noted, such as jewelry; details about any marks, bruises, etc. on the body are noted; any the embalming process and any chemicals used are documented
all clothing, bandages, IV’s, etc. are removed and a strong disinfectant spray is used to clean the eyes, mouth, skin, and other orifices. If rigor mortis (the stiffening of muscles after death) has set in, it is relieved by moving the limbs and head about and massaging the muscles. If the decedent is a man, he is normally shaved at this point. Razor burn (yes, not even death can save you from this) is less likely before the arterial chemical firms the skin of the face. Even women and children are shaved to remove the fine “peach fuzz” we all have on our faces. This is done to avoid the makeup from collecting on the hair and making the makeup more noticeable.
2. Feature setting
the process of placing the facial features and the body itself in the position it will remain in the casket for viewing. This is done before arterial embalming, because the body will be truly “set” – firmed in position once formaldehyde reaches the tissues
Great care is taken to close the eyes. The traditional method for doing this involves placing a bit of cotton between the eye and eyelid. Many times after death the eyes sink back into their sockets, so small plastic “eye caps” are placed on each eye ball. A small amount of stay creme is placed on the eyecap to avoid dehydration of the eyelids - they are sometimes glued shut but are never sewn shut
The mouth is closed either by tying the jaw together with a piece of suture string or by a special injector gun - To finish closing the mouth, many times a mouth former is used, which is similar to an eyecap as it has a textured side that grips the lips, but it is shaped like the mouth. A small amount of stay creme is also used on the mouth to avoid dehydration and help hold the lips in place.
3. Arterial Embalming
Arterial embalming is begun by injecting embalming fluid into an artery while the blood is drained from a nearby vein or from the heart. The two gallons or so needed is usually a mixture of formaldehyde or other chemical and water. Chemicals are also injected by syringe into other areas of the body.
Once the embalming fluid begins to flow into the arterial system, pressure begins to build up in the entire vascular system. This helps the fluid reach all parts of the body and penetrate into the tissues. Evidence of this can be seen in bulging veins throughout the body. The jugular drain tube is opened periodically (it is normally closed) to allow blood to escape and prevent too much pressure in the vascular system which could cause swelling.
Once arterial injection has been completed, the arterial and jugular tubes are removed, the vessels are tied closed, and the incision used to access the vessels is sutured closed and sealed with a special chemical.
4. Cavity Embalming
Cavity treatment starts with aspirating (suctioning) fluids out of the internal organs in the abdomen and thoracic cavity, using a trocar. The embalmer uses it to puncture the stomach, bladder, large intestines, and lungs. Gas and fluids are withdrawn before “cavity fluid” (a stronger mix of formaldehyde) is injected into the torso. The anus and vagina may be packed with cotton or gauze to prevent seepage if necessary. (A close-fitting plastic garment may also be used.) (this only applies to bodies that have not been autopsied)
5. Post-Embalming

The body and hair are washed once more to remove any blood or chemicals and then thoroughly dried; restorations are done now, such as rebuilding features, masking sores or abrasions, etc. Makeup gets applied to the face, neck, and hands. The fingernails are trimmed. The hair is styled, either by the embalmer or by a professional hairdresser or barber.


The remains are dressed in the outfit chosen by the family.


The body is placed into the casket and posed in the proper position. The family normally views the body at this point and decides on any changes that need to be made. During the viewing period (which can sometimes last for several days) the embalmer will periodically check the body for signs of decomposition and takes any corrective action.

THE 5 STAGES OF EMBALMING

1. Pre-embalming

  • once the body is released for embalming by the doctor or medical examiner’s office, the embalmer is called to remove the body. Paperwork is filled out and the body is transported to the funeral home for embalming, if requested or required (not all states, areas require embalming)
  • an embalming report is filled out and any personal items are noted, such as jewelry; details about any marks, bruises, etc. on the body are noted; any the embalming process and any chemicals used are documented
  • all clothing, bandages, IV’s, etc. are removed and a strong disinfectant spray is used to clean the eyes, mouth, skin, and other orifices. If rigor mortis (the stiffening of muscles after death) has set in, it is relieved by moving the limbs and head about and massaging the muscles. If the decedent is a man, he is normally shaved at this point. Razor burn (yes, not even death can save you from this) is less likely before the arterial chemical firms the skin of the face. Even women and children are shaved to remove the fine “peach fuzz” we all have on our faces. This is done to avoid the makeup from collecting on the hair and making the makeup more noticeable.

2. Feature setting

  • the process of placing the facial features and the body itself in the position it will remain in the casket for viewing. This is done before arterial embalming, because the body will be truly “set” – firmed in position once formaldehyde reaches the tissues
  • Great care is taken to close the eyes. The traditional method for doing this involves placing a bit of cotton between the eye and eyelid. Many times after death the eyes sink back into their sockets, so small plastic “eye caps” are placed on each eye ball. A small amount of stay creme is placed on the eyecap to avoid dehydration of the eyelids - they are sometimes glued shut but are never sewn shut
  • The mouth is closed either by tying the jaw together with a piece of suture string or by a special injector gun - To finish closing the mouth, many times a mouth former is used, which is similar to an eyecap as it has a textured side that grips the lips, but it is shaped like the mouth. A small amount of stay creme is also used on the mouth to avoid dehydration and help hold the lips in place.

3. Arterial Embalming

  • Arterial embalming is begun by injecting embalming fluid into an artery while the blood is drained from a nearby vein or from the heart. The two gallons or so needed is usually a mixture of formaldehyde or other chemical and water. Chemicals are also injected by syringe into other areas of the body.
  • Once the embalming fluid begins to flow into the arterial system, pressure begins to build up in the entire vascular system. This helps the fluid reach all parts of the body and penetrate into the tissues. Evidence of this can be seen in bulging veins throughout the body. The jugular drain tube is opened periodically (it is normally closed) to allow blood to escape and prevent too much pressure in the vascular system which could cause swelling.
  • Once arterial injection has been completed, the arterial and jugular tubes are removed, the vessels are tied closed, and the incision used to access the vessels is sutured closed and sealed with a special chemical.

4. Cavity Embalming

  • Cavity treatment starts with aspirating (suctioning) fluids out of the internal organs in the abdomen and thoracic cavity, using a trocar. The embalmer uses it to puncture the stomach, bladder, large intestines, and lungs. Gas and fluids are withdrawn before “cavity fluid” (a stronger mix of formaldehyde) is injected into the torso. The anus and vagina may be packed with cotton or gauze to prevent seepage if necessary. (A close-fitting plastic garment may also be used.) (this only applies to bodies that have not been autopsied)

5. Post-Embalming

  • The body and hair are washed once more to remove any blood or chemicals and then thoroughly dried; restorations are done now, such as rebuilding features, masking sores or abrasions, etc. Makeup gets applied to the face, neck, and hands. The fingernails are trimmed. The hair is styled, either by the embalmer or by a professional hairdresser or barber.

  • The remains are dressed in the outfit chosen by the family.

  • The body is placed into the casket and posed in the proper position. The family normally views the body at this point and decides on any changes that need to be made. During the viewing period (which can sometimes last for several days) the embalmer will periodically check the body for signs of decomposition and takes any corrective action.

serial-killers-101:

Tsutomu Miyazaki
Known as The Little Girl Killer, The Otaku Killer and Dracula, this Japanese serial killer mutilated and murdered four little girls. His murders spanned 1988–1989 and took place in Tokyo’s Saitama Prefecture. His youngest victim was four years old, the oldest was seven. He molested their corpses and drank the blood of one victim, also eating her hands. He terrorized the families of all four victims, sending them letters and postcards where he described his heinous crimes, and also may have called their houses.
He never repented for his crimes, was sentenced to death on April 14, 1997, and executed on June 17, 2008. The very mention of his name still draws contempt and disgust from the Japanese public.

serial-killers-101:

Tsutomu Miyazaki

Known as The Little Girl Killer, The Otaku Killer and Dracula, this Japanese serial killer mutilated and murdered four little girls. His murders spanned 1988–1989 and took place in Tokyo’s Saitama Prefecture. His youngest victim was four years old, the oldest was seven. He molested their corpses and drank the blood of one victim, also eating her hands. He terrorized the families of all four victims, sending them letters and postcards where he described his heinous crimes, and also may have called their houses.

He never repented for his crimes, was sentenced to death on April 14, 1997, and executed on June 17, 2008. The very mention of his name still draws contempt and disgust from the Japanese public.

serial-killers-101:

Richard Chase’s police sketch next to his actual person

serial-killers-101:

Richard Chase’s police sketch next to his actual person

serial-killers-101:

The Virginia Tech massacre was a school shooting that took place on April 16, 2007, on the campus of Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University in Blacksburg, Virginia, United States. Seung-Hui Cho shot and killed 32 people and wounded 17 others in two separate attacks, approximately two hours apart, before committing suicide. (Another 6 people were injured escaping from classroom windows.) The massacre is the deadliest shooting incident by a single gunman in U.S. history. It was also the worst act of mass murder on college students sinceSyracuse University lost 36 students in the bombing of Pan Am Flight 103.[3] It is also the second-deadliest act of mass murder at a school campus, behind the Bath School bombing of 1927.

serial-killers-101:

The Virginia Tech massacre was a school shooting that took place on April 16, 2007, on the campus of Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University in Blacksburg, Virginia, United States. Seung-Hui Cho shot and killed 32 people and wounded 17 others in two separate attacks, approximately two hours apart, before committing suicide. (Another 6 people were injured escaping from classroom windows.) The massacre is the deadliest shooting incident by a single gunman in U.S. history. It was also the worst act of mass murder on college students sinceSyracuse University lost 36 students in the bombing of Pan Am Flight 103.[3] It is also the second-deadliest act of mass murder at a school campus, behind the Bath School bombing of 1927.

forensicsandpathology:

“Defense” type injuries on the hands of an individual who was attacked by an individual wielding a hammer.

forensicsandpathology:

“Defense” type injuries on the hands of an individual who was attacked by an individual wielding a hammer.

ramirezdahmerbundy:

Hedonistic lust killers are probably the scariest and most monstrous of all types of serial killers. Not all of them want to necessarily hurt you or kill you - they simply want to wear your skin or eat your liver or have sex with you severed head. It’s just that your life gets in the way… Edmund Kemper, who murdered ten victims and had sex with their corpses and various mutilated body parts, explained that the actual killing of his victims had little to do with his fantasies. “I’m sorry to sound so cold about this, but what I needed to have was a particular experience with a person, and to possess them in the way I have wanted to: I had to evict them from their human bodies.” Lust killers often have an ideal victim type in mind with fetishistic elements - type of footwear or clothing worn, colour or style of hair, body shape, a ‘cheerleader type’ or a ‘slutty type,’ and so on. Lust killers often need intimate skin-to-skin in their killing, and use a knife or strangulation to murder. Necrophilia is a very frequent aspect of lust killer homicides. They are mostly highly organised, having gone through years of the process of transforming and rehearsing their often bizarre fantasies into reality. Lust killers are often aware that their victim choice is visible to police and may choose to travel to various jurisdictions in both their hunt for and disposal of victims. Because sometimes these killers consume certain body parts or focus on them, dismembered victims may be spread over different locations. The lust killer usually chooses different dumping grounds for each victim.

ramirezdahmerbundy:

Hedonistic lust killers are probably the scariest and most monstrous of all types of serial killers. Not all of them want to necessarily hurt you or kill you - they simply want to wear your skin or eat your liver or have sex with you severed head. It’s just that your life gets in the way… Edmund Kemper, who murdered ten victims and had sex with their corpses and various mutilated body parts, explained that the actual killing of his victims had little to do with his fantasies. “I’m sorry to sound so cold about this, but what I needed to have was a particular experience with a person, and to possess them in the way I have wanted to: I had to evict them from their human bodies.” Lust killers often have an ideal victim type in mind with fetishistic elements - type of footwear or clothing worn, colour or style of hair, body shape, a ‘cheerleader type’ or a ‘slutty type,’ and so on. Lust killers often need intimate skin-to-skin in their killing, and use a knife or strangulation to murder. Necrophilia is a very frequent aspect of lust killer homicides. They are mostly highly organised, having gone through years of the process of transforming and rehearsing their often bizarre fantasies into reality. Lust killers are often aware that their victim choice is visible to police and may choose to travel to various jurisdictions in both their hunt for and disposal of victims. Because sometimes these killers consume certain body parts or focus on them, dismembered victims may be spread over different locations. The lust killer usually chooses different dumping grounds for each victim.

Apr 9

ramirezdahmerbundy:

On Monday, 22 July 1991, two Milwaukee patrolmen came across something they didn’t see everyday. A hysterical, partially naked black man was running down the street with a handcuff hanging off one wrist. The man, Tracy Edwards, flagged down the two policemen and told them that he had escaped from a nearby apartment belonging to 31-year-old Jeffrey Dahmer. Edwards had been lured there on the pretext of a party, but once he was inside Dahmer made sexual advances and threatened him with a knife. Edwards escaped from the apartment when Dahmer allowed him to go to the bathroom. He then went back with the police and confronted Dahmer in the doorway of his apartment. What the police discovered inside the modest Milwaukee apartment repulsed them, the nation and the world.

Apr 6
CLASSIFICATION OF DEATHS
Non-criminal
natural causes
accidental deaths
suicide
Homicide - can be criminal or non-criminal
Homicides can often be staged to appear to be non-criminal.

CLASSIFICATION OF DEATHS

Non-criminal

  • natural causes
  • accidental deaths
  • suicide

Homicide - can be criminal or non-criminal

Homicides can often be staged to appear to be non-criminal.

Apr 5
Pink skin discolouration caused by monoxide poisoning. The unique skin appearance is an immediate to clue as to the cause of death.

Pink skin discolouration caused by monoxide poisoning. The unique skin appearance is an immediate to clue as to the cause of death.