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John Wayne Gacy’s Brain
On May 10, 1994, about 3 a.m., Dr. Helen Morrison received word: John Wayne Gacy, who prowled the Chicago streets preying on lonely runaways and murdered 33 young men and boys, had been executed.
Dr. Morrison headed out to a nearby hospital where she donned scrubs and Latex gloves to assist in Gacy’s autopsy.
For Morrison, it was a strange final chapter to her 14-year history with the clown-turned-killer. The forensic psychiatrist had interviewed Gacy many times, listening to his rants, raves, lies, boasts, explanations and evasions.
Now she was back for something else: Gacy’s brain. Morrison had made arrangements to have the brain examined to see if there was anything — tumors, scars, disease — that made it abnormal.
When the autopsy was over, Morrison drove home with Gacy’s brain in a glass jar on the passenger seat of her Buick.
It took several calls to find a pathologist who would do the tests, and a few weeks later an express-mail envelope arrived at her office. She was not surprised by the summary.
“Just one simple line,” she says. “Normal brain.”

John Wayne Gacy’s Brain

On May 10, 1994, about 3 a.m., Dr. Helen Morrison received word: John Wayne Gacy, who prowled the Chicago streets preying on lonely runaways and murdered 33 young men and boys, had been executed.

Dr. Morrison headed out to a nearby hospital where she donned scrubs and Latex gloves to assist in Gacy’s autopsy.

For Morrison, it was a strange final chapter to her 14-year history with the clown-turned-killer. The forensic psychiatrist had interviewed Gacy many times, listening to his rants, raves, lies, boasts, explanations and evasions.

Now she was back for something else: Gacy’s brain. Morrison had made arrangements to have the brain examined to see if there was anything — tumors, scars, disease — that made it abnormal.

When the autopsy was over, Morrison drove home with Gacy’s brain in a glass jar on the passenger seat of her Buick.

It took several calls to find a pathologist who would do the tests, and a few weeks later an express-mail envelope arrived at her office. She was not surprised by the summary.

“Just one simple line,” she says. “Normal brain.”